Rothamsted Research

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Historical crop samples link changes in wheat disease to air pollution

Using DNA from a Victorian field experiment, scientists have discovered how changes in air pollution over the last 160 years have affected wheat diseases

Scientists at Rothamsted Research in Harpenden and the University of Reading have been able to recover DNA from crop diseases on wheat samples stored as part of a Victorian field experiment. Using this DNA, they have discovered how changes in air pollution over the last 160 years have affected fungal diseases on our wheat crops.

Radar tracking reveals that butterflies follow decisive flight paths

The charming meanderings of butterflies are not as random as they appear, according to new research

The charming meanderings of butterflies are not as random as they appear, according to new research. Scientists at Rothamsted Research in Harpenden have found that their seemingly irresolute flutterings are in fact decisive flight paths. The harmonic radar has been used before to track the flights of bumblebees and honeybees. Now it has been shown to work for butterflies too, opening a new window on the flight behaviour of these important pollinating species.

Scientific Research in the Developing World to benefit from free GenStat statistical software

VSN International has launched a free version of their commercial software

VSN International, developers of the GenStat statistical system, has launched a free version of their commercial software available to non-commercial users and not-for-profit organisations in Developing world countries. GenStat for Windows Discovery Edition is available for immediate download (see link below).

The development of Septoria resistance to strobilurins was too rapid for resistance management

Resistance was found in around 80% of the Septoria samples tested in 2004, compared to 39% at the start of 2003

Why do some people get bitten by mosquitoes more than others?

Scientists at Rothamsted Research in Hertfordshire think they may have found the answer and their work could lead to the development of novel insect repellents

Why is it that when you go on holiday some members of your family always seem to get bitten more than others? Scientists at Rothamsted Research in Hertfordshire think they may have found the answer and their work could lead to the development of novel insect repellents.

New GM crop management systems give wildlife benefits

Sientists from Broom's Barn Research Station conclusively show how to use GM herbicide tolerant (GMHT) crop technology for environmental benefit

In research published today1, scientists from Broom's Barn Research Station conclusively show how to use GM herbicide tolerant (GMHT) crop technology for environmental benefit. The authors suggest that the new crop management approaches they have demonstrated could resolve legitimate concerns about indirect environmental effects of GM sugar beet on weeds, insects and birds.

Local MP becomes a scientist for a day at Rothamsted Research

St Albans MP Kerry Pollard tried his hand at molecular biology when he visited the laboratory of Dr Lin Field

St Albans MP Kerry Pollard tried his hand at molecular biology when he visited the laboratory of Dr Lin Field at Rothamsted Research on Friday 7th January. He conducted a chemical assay to determine whether aphids have high levels of an enzyme that makes them resistant to insecticides. The assay, developed at Rothamsted, is an important tool for scientists in diagnosing problems with insect resistance to pesticides.

MBE for Rothamsted's Sue McCartney

Rothamsted Director's PA Sue McCartney has been awarded an MBE in the New Year Honours List

Rothamsted Director's PA Sue McCartney has been awarded an MBE in the New Year Honours List

Sue received the award for services to agriculture. She retired in December, after working at Rothamsted for 25 years and has worked with two heads of Department and four directors. "I'm honoured and absolutely delighted. It's a nice way to end a career of 25 years at Rothamsted, which has been a wonderful place to work," she says.

BRIGHT throws light on the impact of GM crops on farming

The project studied the effects of rotating GM crops tolerant to glyphosate and glufosinate herbicides and non-GM crops at five research centres in England and Scotland

The results of the BRIGHT project, a four year study of GM herbicide tolerant crops, are published today. The project studied the effects of rotating GM crops tolerant to glyphosate and glufosinate herbicides and non-GM crops at five research centres in England and Scotland. The full report can be found at the link below.

National prize for Rothamsted photographer

Graham Shephard has won a prize in the 2004 Novartis and The Daily Telegraph Visions of Science Photographic Awards

Professor Alastair McCartney has received a 'National Friendship Award' from the Chinese Government

The award is the highest the Chinese Government makes to non-Chinese experts.

Professor McCartney was presented with a medal in the Great Hall Of the People, Beijing. The award was one of 84 "National Friendship Awards" presented this year to foreign experts from 22 different countries. The award winners attended a state banquet hosted by Chinese Premier, Mr Wen Jiabao. Professor McCartney is an authority on the spread of crop diseases and the award, which is the highest the Chinese Government makes to non-Chinese experts, is in recognition of his services to Chinese agriculture.

Resistance-busting technology developed to control the super pests

UK and Australian scientists have developed a technique that delivers a carefully timed double blow to insects that have evolved pesticide resistance

Rothamsted's Centenary Laboratory wins hat trick of awards

On Friday the Centenary Laboratory, at Rothamsted Research in Harpenden, received three awards from the Royal Institute of British Architects at a special ceremony in Cambridge

On Friday the Centenary Laboratory, at Rothamsted Research in Harpenden, received three awards from the Royal Institute of British Architects at a special ceremony in Cambridge (the East Spirit of Ingenuity Architecture Awards for 2004) . R.H. Partnership Architects, won the "Architecture for Business" award and were runners-up in the "Landscaping" award, whilst Rothamsted received the Client award.

The Laboratory was opened in September last year and provides a purpose-built environment for 200 scientists. It can be viewed from a public footpath through the Rothamsted estate.

Two thirds of British moth species are in decline

Data from a nationwide network of light traps has revealed that two thirds of British moth species have declined over the past 35 years

Data from a nationwide network of light traps has revealed that two thirds of British moth species have declined over the past 35 years. Worst affected are species, such as the Dusky Thorn and Hedge Rustic, which have decreased by more than 90%. It may be that they are suffering from the effects of global warming. "These species overwinter as eggs," explains Rothamsted scientist Dr Kelvin Conrad, "and they don't appear to be surviving the warmer, wetter winters of recent years".

Using the world's oldest field experiment to detect nuclear fallout and other environmental changes

Scientists are using these samples for the evidence they provide of air pollution, global warming and even nuclear testing

CBE for Rothamsted Scientist

Rothamsted scientist Professor John Pickett, FRS, has been awarded a CBE in the Queen's Birthday Honours list for services to Biological Chemistry

Rothamsted scientist Professor John Pickett, FRS, has been awarded a CBE in the Queen's Birthday Honours list for services to Biological Chemistry.

Major new initiative boosts crop genetics and breeding research

Research supporting the genetics and breeding of major crops is being revitalised by a Defra initiative creating a series of Crop Genetic Improvement Networks

Visit by HRH The Duke of Gloucester to Rothamsted Research

The Duke was introduced to some of Rothamsted's scientific staff and the Mayor of St Albans and the Mayor of Harpenden

HRH The Duke of Gloucester visited Rothamsted Research in Harpenden, Hertfordshire on Monday the 5th April. Rothamsted is one of the world's leading agricultural research institutes. The Duke learnt about its past achievements and ongoing activities. He was shown around the Institute's state-of-the-art laboratories and heard about experimental programmes from the Institute's Director, Professor Ian Crute. The Duke was also introduced to some of Rothamsted's scientific staff and the Mayor of St Albans and the Mayor of Harpenden.

Rothamsted welcomes its 100th overseas fellow

Rothamsted International recently welcomed Dr John Agbenin of Ahmadu Bello University, Nigeria as its 100th charitable fellow

Rothamsted International recently welcomed Dr John Agbenin of Ahmadu Bello University, Nigeria as its 100th charitable fellow. This small charity brings scientists from developing countries to the UK for scientific training at Rothamsted that they can use to improve the sustainability of agriculture in their home country.

"This is a really happy landmark for us, which we could not have reached without the generosity of the local community, "says charity director Dr Judy Mann. "Over our first ten years, visitors from all over the developing world have benefited from this scheme."

Biodiversity benefits of GM maize are likely to be reduced but not eliminated by forthcoming ban on triazine weed killers

Research just published in Nature

Research just published in Nature (1) by the scientific consortium behind the GM farm scale trials (2) concludes that the comparative benefits for biodiversity from GM herbicide tolerant (GMHT) maize are likely to be reduced but not eliminated by the forthcoming EU withdrawal of triazine weed killers.

Rothamsted Research and HGCA to work together on knowledge transfer

Rothamsted Research is committed to enhancing its communications with the arable farming industry

The recently renamed Rothamsted Research Association (RRA - formerly Arable Research Institute Association) has decided that its dialogue with the farming industry for 2004 will be conducted through a close working relationship with the HGCA and partnerships with other research organisations. Rothamsted Research is committed to enhancing its communications with the arable farming industry and is seeking effective vehicles to transfer knowledge of the latest research findings as well as receiving feedback on future prospects.

The world's largest aphid species found at Rothamsted Research

The giant willow aphid, Tuberolachnus salignus, has been found on the National Willow Collection

The collection has been established at Rothamsted to conserve and study diverse types of willow used for basket making, cricket bats and more recently green bio-energy fuel. "These aphids can grow to a quarter of an inch long, making them a giant among aphids" says scientist Dr Ian Shield. "They have formed huge colonies on some of our willow species and we don't yet know how much harm they will do".

Farm Scale Evaluations

Rothamsted Research is part of the scientific consortium that has carried out the farm-scale evaluations of GM, herbicide tolerant crops

Rothamsted Research is part of the scientific consortium that has carried out the farm-scale evaluations of GM, herbicide tolerant crops. The first results from this study were published on Thursday 16th October

BioMarket and BioProduct.info plan for next 3 years

The team at Rothamsted Research that bring you the annual BioMarket event and BioProduct.info are planning the provision of these services through to the end of 2006

The team at Rothamsted Research that bring you the annual BioMarket event and the year round interactive technology transfer data base on BioProduct.info are now planning the provision of these services through to the end of 2006. The submission to the European Commission has been shortlisted for part-funding as a Specific Support Activity under FP6 and contract negotiation have been initiated. The competition for funding was especially demanding and having been chosen the team is determined to make the next 4 events even better than before.

Rothamsted Research at Cereals 2003

Assessing your crops' sulphur needs

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